Vector V

2055, Funk’s Vector, the one that started it all.

All new Anthracite and Flame livery, Vector V is in its final incarnation.

An altogether sleek appearance has been brought about by a new smoothly textured, matt, Anthracite finish which immediately catches the eye and enhances its graceful lines and set off by new, finely engineered parts and trim.

The Drive:

Secretly some people seem to feel that Direct Drives have some “technical superiority” over belt drives…But do they?

The three-pulley system supports the platter keeping it in balance.

In Vector, belt drive is now in the front line of technical performance of motor units onto which to mount your chosen arm.*
Funk has some of the best arms available on offer at prices to suit your pocket, with FX3 being the ideal partner for Vector V.

The Vector jockey-pulley system radically reduces basic rate wow and Vector V benefited enormously….It will have the rock sold tonality of a Direct Drive, avoiding the slightly vague-pitch quality of a typical belt driveNoel Keywood HIFi World

Features:
Ultra-Smooth two speed motor unit with Vector Drive for Direct-Drive like stability and vice-like control.
Strata derived platter for exceptional inert record support.
Adjustable stainless steel feet.
Distributed mode plinth design avoids strongly resonant plinth signature.

Kinetik Kradle completes the package. A sleek, hand crafted cover protects your deck from dust, whilst the very damaging effects of sonic junk found everywhere are kept at bay by the Bo!ng based isolation in the base platform.

*There is a rational to a belt driven system. It is in fact a very good drive system indeed for when correctly implemented, the faster turning motor instantly permits a lighter touch to speed control.

Think of a bird soaring smoothly through the air.
Its smooth flight belies the fact that it is constantly making microscopic adjustments (but only when necessary!) to produce the final result of a masterpiece of continuity.
The same applies to turntable drive: the more microscopic the correction for a belt driven system, and Vector is testament to it.